A- A+

10 Great Walks

Walk and discover Amazing Albany. A guide to Albany’s spectacular walks for all ages.

Escaping our everyday life for a bushwalk in the natural environment can be an enjoyable and healthy pastime. However the unique environment around Albany can also be challenging and subject to rapid weather changes. You need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of others in your group (especially children). Planning and preparing before your trip is a key component to staying safe and having an enjoyable experience.

The following are a few tips for planning your trip:

  1. Select a walk suitable to your fitness level and experience. All the walks on this map are graded to guide you using the Australian Walk Track grading system.
  2. Be prepared by taking clothing, water and equipment to suit changes in weather and track conditions.
  3. Walk with friends, it’s more fun and solo bushwalking creates its own risks.
  4. Let a reliable person know your plans before you go. Tell them where you are going and when you plan to return – be sure to advise them of your safe return.
  5. Carry a map and mobile phone but please be aware that some areas around Albany do not have mobile phone coverage.
  6. Bushwalking is not recommended in hot and windy conditions due to the risk of bushfire.

Difficulty Levels

Easy (Grade 1-2)

Walk 1 & 2

Grade One is suitable for the disabled with assistance, and Grade Two is suitable for families with young children.

Intermediate (Grade 3)

Walks 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Grade Three is recommended for people with some bushwalking experience.

Difficult (Grade 4 & 5)

Walks 8, 9, 10

Grade Four is recommended for experienced bushwalkers, and Grade Five is recommended for very experienced bushwalkers

Click a walk below to view more details

This is a versatile walk with many possible options which can be done in either direction.

The sealed path between Emu Point and Ellen Cove (4.6km) follows Middleton Beach with several access points to the beach and car parks and is relatively flat.

From Ellen Cove to Albany Port (3.5km) the path and board walk winds around the coast with stunning views. This section has rolling hills while there are pathways from the track that lead down to rocky vantage points or up to lookouts.

This whole walk is on shared paths with cyclists so please keep left.

Middleton Boardwalk

Grade

Two (2)

Distance

8km one way

Gradient

Gentle hills

Quality of path

Well-formed path

Time

2 to 3 hours one-way

PDF Link

A tranquil walk through small groves of shady trees and alongside tranquil wetlands with stunning views of the lake and up to Mt Adelaide.

There are several lookouts including a bird hide with interpretive signage and seats along the way.

A haven for water birds with over 100 species of birds known to visit this area making it popular with birdwatchers. The lake is also habitat for the western long necked turtle while Quenda are regularly seen on the trail.

A pleasant family walk that includes wheelchair access with assistance from the car park to some lookouts.

Lake Seppings

Grade

Two (2)

Distance

2.9km circuit

Gradient

Flat

Quality of track

Well-formed track

Time

45 minutes

PDF Link

Mt Clarence, home of the Desert Mounted Corps Memorial, is part of the 260-hectare Albany Heritage Park in the heart of Albany.

The area offers a unique blend of natural, cultural and historical values and attractions with many interpretive signs allowing visitors opportunities to learn about the area.

The walk and features including the Padre White lookout provides breathtaking views of King George Sound, Princess Royal Harbour and as far as the Stirling Range.

A further option is to walk to the Padre White lookout following the well sign posted trail from the Town Square.

Albany Heritage Park

Grade

Three (3)

Distance

3.2km circuit

Gradient

Short, steep hills

Quality of path

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

1 to 2 hours

PDF Link

Starting from the carpark at the corner of Forts Road and Apex Drive in Albany Heritage Park this walk meanders through natural bushland with splendid views over Princess Royal Harbour, King George Sound and Middleton Bay from several vantage points.

The walk has many historical sites and interpretative signage regarding the area’s military history found near the Heritage area, Forts and National ANZAC Centre.

King skinks are common on the trail, and wildflowers are plentiful in spring.

There are seats located throughout the walk and refreshments and toilets available near the National ANZAC Centre.

Mount Adelaide

Grade

Three (3)

Distance

2.25km circuit

Gradient

Short, steep hills

Quality of track

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

45 minutes to 1 hour

PDF Link

The Luke Pen Walk trail, located along the Kalgan River, is a beautiful meandering walk trail closely following the river.

The walk provides constantly changing views of the river along with a mixture of vineyards, green pastures with grazing cattle and eucalypt bushland. The river is like a mirror on a calm day and provides amazing photography opportunities.

A shady walk for a hot day with opportunities to see the abundant wildlife that inhabits the river environment including pelicans, ducks and osprey. While thornbills and both the Splendid and Red-winged Fairy-wrens can be seen in bush beside the river.

Luke Pen Walk

Grade

Three (3)

Distance

12km return

Gradient

Gentle hills

Quality of track

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

3 to 4 hours

PDF Link

This is an excellent walk along the narrow isthmus between Princess Royal Harbor and King George sound from Whalers Cove with fabulous views of Princess Royal Harbour, Whalers Cove, Albany, and King George Sound.

The walk includes two sections of beach walking, steps up some steep sections and climbs over granite to the end of Point Possession that provides views of the channel between Princess Royal Harbour and King George Sound which is the shipping access to Albany Port.

Wildflowers and whales abound in season, while dolphins are often seen in the bays and channel.

Point Possession

Grade

Three (3)

Distance

4.9km circuit

Gradient

Short, steep hills

Quality of track

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

2 to 3 hours

PDF Link

This walk forms part of the iconic Bibbulmun track, which stretches from Kalamunda to Albany and is just over 1,000kms in length.

Starting at the Albany Windfarm with its 18 wind turbines, the track initially follows the path and boardwalk before it meanders over the sand dunes with many lookouts with views to Albany, Eclipse Island and Torbay to name a few.

The walk ends at the car park on the corner of Bay View Drive and Frenchman Bay Road.

Part of the walk is in the Torndirrup National Park where dogs are not allowed.

Albany Heritage Park

Grade

Three (3)

Distance

8.5km one way

Gradient

Short, steep hills

Quality of path

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

2 to 3 hours

PDF Link

This walk in Gull Rock National Park is in a beautiful coastal setting and offers outstanding views of Breaksea and Michaelmas Islands, Albany’s harbours, the Torndirrup Peninsula and inland to the Stirling Range.

The walk has several short, steep hills with steps. At its furthest point Voyager Park directly opposite Emu Point provides a good picnic spot.

There is an extensive range of plant life including orchids, Banksia, Dryandra. Kingia and more.

Good whale watching opportunities during the season

As the walk is in the national park, dogs are not allowed.

Mount Martin

Grade

Four (4)

Distance

12.3km circuit

Gradient

Short, steep hills

Quality of path

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

4 to 5 hours

PDF Link

Peak Head is the Torndirrup Peninsula’s southernmost peak and can be reached only via a rugged 4.3 km return walk track, which is steep in sections providing a challenging but rewarding experience.

Some rock scrambling is required to reach the peaks summit and walkers must be aware of slippery rocks and that rock climbers may be on the cliffs below.

There are magnificent views of Eclipse Island, West Cape Howe, Bald Head and the vast Southern Ocean where whales can be seen breaching between June and September.

The heathland along this walk comes alive in wildflower season.

Peak Head

Grade

Four (4)

Distance

4.3km

Gradient

Very steep

Quality of path

Formed track, some obstacles

Time

2 to 2.5 hours

PDF Link

The Bald Head Walking trail provides spectacular views of the striking coastal scenery of the Flinders Peninsula in Torndirrup National Park.

Walkers are rewarded with breathtaking views of the coastline along the trail and at the end of the track.

In several spots the Southern Ocean to the south and King George Sound to the north can be seen from the same location as the trail follows the ridge line providing spectacular photographic opportunities.

The trail winds over 8km through low heath until it reaches the cairn at Bald Head before walkers return along the same trail.

Bald Head

Grade

Four (4)

Distance

16km return

Gradient

Short, steep hills

Quality of path

Rough track, many obstacles

Time

6 to 7 hours

PDF Link

Protect what we love!

Bushwalking in bushland areas has the potential to spread dieback. Dieback (Phytophthora cinnamomi) is a plant pathogen that is recognised as one of the key threatening processes to Australia’s biodiversity.

Dieback lives in soil, water and plant material and attacks plant roots restricting the uptake of water and nutrients.

Human activity including by bushwalkers causes the greatest spread of dieback. To help restrict the spread of dieback and protect the bush land that we love please;

For more information visit the Project Dieback website www.dieback.net.au